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Monday, February 1, 2016

JOHN CORNYN LEADS GOP CONGRESS ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM (2nd CHANCES)







JOHN CORNYN LEADS GOP CONGRESS ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM:


GOP TAKES ACTION TO GRANT EX-OFFENDERS OPPORTUNITIES FOR 2ND CHANCE.


**** Senator John Cornyn Aims To Sway Fellow Republicans On Criminal Justice


Senator John Cornyn, a former Texas judge and attorney general, is a devoted believer in the criminal justice overhaulawaiting its moment in the Senate. Now, he just has to convert doubting Republican colleagues.
Mr. Cornyn, the No. 2 Senate Republican and a main author of the criminal justice legislation, which would cut some sentences and ease re-entry after prison, is working to address fears from fellow Republicans that passage of the bill could set loose some dangerous offenders and diminish the party’s law-and-order image.
Acknowledging the deep skepticism, Mr. Cornyn said in an interview that his job was to educate Republicans who were only beginning to focus on the legislation and to make clear that it would not throw open the gates of federal prisons.
“Nobody is getting out of jail free, which is some of the characterization that is out there,” said Mr. Cornyn, who describes himself “as conservative as they come.”
For months, momentum has been building for a comprehensive criminal justice package aimed at easing mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent offenders. The effort has been driven by an unusual right-left alliance that includes the conservatives Charles G. and David H. Koch and the American Civil Liberties Union.
The Senate Judiciary Committee approved its plan on a strong bipartisan vote in October, and companion legislation is moving in the House. But Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, has not committed to bringing the legislation to the floor. Mr. McConnell has been cautious on the issue, and other Republicans have expressed increasingly vocal opposition, with the latest resistance coming from Senator Tom Cotton, Republican of Arkansas.
Mr. Cornyn’s primary role in writing the legislation, combined with his spot near the top of the Republican leadership ladder, has made him a critical player in determining whether the legislation advances this year.
“He is the reason it is happening, in my opinion,” said Mark Holden, the general counsel for Koch Industries and the company’s point man on criminal justice issues. “He is the driving force.”
But it is unclear how far that drive will go. In a development first reported by Politico, opposition to the legislation boiled up at a closed party lunch last week, with Mr. Cotton taking a strong position against the bill. Mr. McConnell, one attendee said, reminded senators of the case of Willie Horton, the Massachusetts felon who committed violent crimes while on furlough and became an issue in the 1988 presidential race.
“I don’t believe we should allow thousands of violent felons to be released early from prison, nor do I believe we should reduce sentences for violent offenders in the future,” Mr. Cotton said in an interview. He said that the criminal justice legislation was being driven by a “myth” of mass incarceration of low-level, nonviolent offenders in federal prisons, and that most prisoners had already cut their sentences under plea bargains.

Some senators said Mr. Cornyn and other Republican backers of the legislation may have misread the willingness of their colleagues to embrace the criminal justice movement and had too much faith that others would be swayed by the support of conservatives such as Senators Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, and Mike Lee of Utah.
“John has some work to do, big-time work,” to secure enough support to persuade Mr. McConnell to go forward, said one Republican senator who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal party matters.
Mr. Cornyn, who became enthusiastic about the issue after successful changes to the criminal justice system in Texas, where he was a judge for 13 years, said discussions had begun on the staff and senator-to-senator levels to clear up misconceptions. 
He noted that sentencing provisions in the measure would apply to about 5,000 offenders — far fewer than in earlier sentencing proposals — and that those now serving time would have to reappear before the same judge and prosecutor to win a reduction in time served.
“Some people are now realizing for the first time that they may have to vote on this thing, so they need more information,” said Mr. Cornyn, who added that he would be asking colleagues what changes might be needed to win their backing.
He said that Mr. McConnell would like to lessen the party divisions before deciding to devote weeks of scarce Senate floor time to the criminal justice proposition.
“This is all part of his calculation, and we are trying to work with him and all my colleagues and figure a way to get this done,” Mr. Cornyn said. “It is not the kiss of death if you don’t do this in 2016, but I would like to. I think we have a window here.”
Another part of the calculation is the 2016 battle for the Senate and the vulnerability of some Republican incumbents in swing states.
Some analysts have suggested that it could help Republicans by broadening their appeal to independents, Democrats and minorities who believe that the criminal justice system is unfairly tilted.
Mr. Cornyn said he agreed. “It doesn’t hurt to show that you actually care,” he said. “This is a statement that is not just symbolic, but actually shows that you care about people. It doesn’t hurt to show some empathy.”

Sources:  NY Times,  Politico,  Youtube








MICHAEL FEENEY - ANOTHER GREAT JOURNALIST MYSTERIOUSLY DIES (BLOCK FREEDOM OF PRESS)




MICHAEL FEENEY - ANOTHER GREAT JOURNALIST MYSTERIOUSLY DIES (BLOCK FREEDOM OF PRESS):


~ ARE OBAMA & OTHER WORLD LEADERS BLOCKING 1st AMENDMENT SPEECH TO INTIMIDATE CITIZENS??


Michael J. Feeney, a former New York Daily News reporter and rising star among black journalists who became known for his exclusive interviews with celebrities such as Jay-Z, Beyoncé and Rihanna has died. He was 32.

"They (doctors) worked on him, and worked on him but couldn't get him back," said Feeney's mother, Reba Willis, 63, of Teaneck, New Jersey in a tearful phone Monday interview one day after his death. "The doctors didn't see this coming."
But Feeney, who died from complications from a staph infection to his kidneys, may have.

And as his conditioned worsened, the former journalist who covered the death of legendary pop singer Whitney Houston nearly four years ago, laid in a hospital bed crafting his own obituary.

"I'm going to die in here," Willis said Feeney told her days before dying.

He spent a total of three weeks this month as a patient at Holy Name Medical Center in Teaneck.

Feeney, who served as the president of the New York Association of Black Journalists from 2011 until December, was known among his colleagues and friends as someone who pushed for diversity in newsrooms across the country.

He also mentored high school and college students who aspired to be professional journalists.
Newsday reporter Aisha Al-Muslim asked Feeney for career advice on a few occasions.

"He was a role model for young journalists and for anyone who sought advice," said Al-Muslin. "I'm going to remember him for his dance skills and bright smile."

Feeney, who had recently accepted an entertainment reporting position with CNN.com, joined the Daily News in 2009 first as a police reporter and later covering Harlem.

It was there where he made his mark, landing exclusive interviews and taking popular selfies with A-list celebrities like Alicia Keys, Jay-Z, Beyoncé and Rihanna while also writing about the historic Apollo Theater.

In 2010, he was named the Emerging Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black journalists.

Feeney covered the Baltimore unrest after Freddie Gray's death for NBC News and NBCBLK, filing stories beyond the front lines of the marches; inside crowded churches, on college campuses with Black millennials stepping up as change agents, and beside the patrons of New Beginnings Barbershop.

As news of Feeney's death spread, so did the wide-ranging acknowledgements.
"He was a beacon of hope for young BLACK journalists.

He was passionate about creating a blue print for people to get ahead in the industry," said Candace Amos, a New York Daily News reporter. "He wanted to see you succeed and he would do anything in his power to make that happen."

Marlon A. Walker is an education reporter with the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Vice-President of Print for NABJ.

“It’s quickly becoming known the importance that somebody with Feeney's passion can have on people," Walker said.

"Everyone is talking about him, including people who didn't know him. For the people who did, the loss is much greater.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, the Rev. Al Sharpton, political analyst Roland Martin and Hot 97 host Charlamagne Tha God tweeted about Feeney's death.

By Monday morning, Feeney was trending on Facebook, something unthinkable for a newspaper reporter.

"The outpouring has been unbelievable," said Willis, who saved a voicemail from her elated son when he interviewed his idol, retired New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.

Funeral arrangements are pending and a memorial fund has been set up in his honor, the proceeds will be sent to his family.


Sources: NBC News, BBC, Independent.co.uk, NY Mag, AJC, NY Daily News, Youtube

IOWA VOTERS GET OUT THE VOTE & SUPPORT THE GOP (AMERICA'S FUTURE)




IOWA VOTERS GET OUT THE VOTE & SUPPORT THE GOP:

IOWA CAUCUSES - FEBRUARY 1, 2016

Attention IOWA Voters:

If you want to see the United States of America return to GREATNESS, please cast your ballots for a GOP candidate.

I highly recommend DONALD TRUMP but as long as you support the GOP, you are voting to rebuild America.

If you want the Status Quo, vote DEMOCRAT.

If you want GREATNESS even as a BLACK voter, then consider casting your ballot for the GOP.

Get Out The Vote February 1, 2016 In IOWA!


*** As Iowa Caucus Vote Nears, Trump, Sanders Bet On High Turnout For An Edge

Real estate mogul Donald Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) made a final push Monday to coax non-traditional voters to the caucuses here, even as their chief rivals suggested well-tested organizing tactics would give them the crucial margin of victory instead.

As the first nominating contest of the 2016 election approached in Iowa, Trump expressed cautious optimism and launched a harsh attack against his chief caucus rival, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.).
Republican officials anticipate a record turnout given the enthusiasm surrounding Trump’s candidacy.

“You have to be a little bit nervous, and you know I like to win,” Trump said on ABC’s “Good Morning America” show on Monday morning. “This is actually my first election night. I’ve gone through many election nights, but it was always for somebody else.”

“This is a little bit different for me,” he added.

Speaking in Waterloo, Iowa, several hours later, Trump blasted Cruz as a politician indebted to special oil interests. He told voters that his chief caucus rival would without a doubt end the federal renewable fuels standard, a key issue in the state.

“I don’t want to use names but I will, okay? I’m looking at the money put up by Ted Cruz, for Ted Cruz. It’s incredible, the people there. It’s controlled. And he will destroy your ethanol business 100 percent. One hundred percent,” he said. “He’s financed by oil people and the oil people don’t want ethanol, it’s very simple. Your ethanol business, if Ted Cruz gets in, will be wiped out within six months to a year. It’s going to be gone. It’s going to be gone.”

With a massive winter storm looming for the Hawkeye State on Monday night, the campaigns in both parties have closely monitored weather conditions to estimate how voter turnout might be affected.

Front-runners and long shots alike are counting on their supporters to push them over the top in Monday evening’s caucuses, which will come just hours before a massive winter storm is expected to descend on the state.

“We’ve got such a great campaign organization. We’ve got thousands of volunteers. We knocked on 125,000 doors this weekend. There’s just so much excitement,” Clinton said on NBC’s “Today” show Monday morning. “We hope that even though it’s a tight race, a lot of the people who are committed to caucusing for me will be there and standing up for me. And I will do the same for them in the campaign and in the presidency.”

There is no question that the lack of an incumbent candidate, coupled with the unconventional style of several candidates, has sparked Iowans’ interest in the race this year. Jeff Kaufmann, who chairs the Iowa Republican Party, said his office has been receiving five to six times as many calls compared to past years.

“The phone calls at the Republican Party of Iowa headquarters are absolutely unprecedented. I mean, we’re looking at 100 an hour, literally,” he said. “Now, obviously, not all of that is tied to Donald Trump. There’s also a lot of these calls that are going to a variety of candidates.

But I think that’s a sign of the enthusiasm.”


Sources: Washington Post, Youtube

Thursday, January 28, 2016

RUBIO, BUSH, CRUZ & PAUL DEBATE AMNESTY IN IOWA



RUBIO, BUSH, CRUZ & PAUL DEBATE AMNESTY IN IOWA:

Sources: Fox News, Google, Youtube

MIKE HUCKABEE SCHOOLS MEDIA ON FAIR COVERAGE & HELPING THE POOR (LIVE IN IOWA)





MIKE HUCKABEE SCHOOLS MEDIA ON FAIR COVERAGE & HELPING THE POOR (LIVE IN IOWA):

Almost immediately after participating in the Undercard Debate in Iowa, 2016 GOP Presidential candidate MIKE HUCKABEE kindly granted interviews with members of the Media.

Surrounded by a sea of Journalists and Media reps, I was finally able to get close enough to capture 3 minutes of Gov Huckabee discussing his campaign receiving unfair air time and the best strategy for helping lift Poor people out of Poverty.

Sources:  Fox News, Google, Youtube

DONALD TRUMP REMAINS FOCUS OF IOWA GOP DEBATE IN ABSENTIA (HELPS FORGOTTEN VETS)




DONALD TRUMP REMAINS FOCUS OF IOWA GOP DEBATE IN ABSENTIA:

TRUMP USES HIS INFLUENCE TO HELP FORGOTTEN VETS.

DES MOINES REPRESENTS THE VOICE OF MIDDLE AMERICA.

Even after pulling out of the GOP Iowa Debate, 2016 presidential Frontrunner Donald Trump remains the focus of Thursday night's event.

Instead of participating in the 2016 Iowa GOP debate, Mr Trump will host another event to raise a ton of money to help our nation's Wounded VETS.

Since no one else seems to care about our nation's VETS, it's nice to see a busy Business Mogul such as Donald Trump choosing to use his influence to help VETS.

I support Mr Trump's decision not to attend the Iowa debate because his absence is helping to revise the Political process as it relates to electing a new president.

American voters are tired of Status Quo Politics which is controlled entirely by super Wealthy donors.

By refusing to play old Political games, Mr Trump is forcing both the Republican and Democrat parties to return the election process back into the hands everyday American voters as mandated by the U.S. Constitution (12th amendment; article 2).

For example:
Everyday hardworking people like the citizens of DES MOINES, Iowa.

Sources: CBS News, Youtube

2016 GOP PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE - IOWA EVENTS CENTER (LIVE COVERAGE)





@Iowa

2016 GOP PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE - IOWA EVENTS CENTER:

LIVE COVERAGE, FOX NEWS NETWORK, 7PM & 9PM ET

Hosted by Fox News & Google


*** UNDERCARD DEBATE LINE UP:

7pm ET (6pm CT, 5pm MT, 4pm PT)

MODERATORS: Martha MacCallum and Bill Hemmer

CANDIDATES: Fiorina, Huckabee, Santorum, Gilmore

**** PRIMETIME DEBATE:

9pm ET (8pm CT, 7pm MT, 6pm PT)

MODERATORS: Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly and Chris Wallace

CANDIDATES: Trump*, Cruz, Rubio, Carson, Bush, Christie, Kasich, Paul


*Trump has stated he will not participate in this debate.


Sources: Fox News, US Presidential Election News











BLACK PASTOR OF RICHMOND, VA INNER CITY CHURCH ENDORSES TRUMP (DR STEVE PARSONS)










@BlackPastors

BLACK PASTOR OF RICHMOND, VA INNER CITY CHURCH ENDORSES TRUMP (DR STEVE PARSONS):

TRUMP IS ATTRACTING MORE 2016 BLACK VOTERS TO THE GOP.

DR STEVE PARSONS SAYS TRUMP IS NOT RACIST.

HE STATES DEMOCRAT LEADERS ARE SPREADING LIES ABOUT TRUMP BEING RACIST.

Dr Steve Parson says Black Americans will vote for Donald Trump because the Wealthy who are in support of him for President are willing to fund the inner city and Minorities with Billions to make America great again and prove they are not racist and have a heart for all minorities.

Sources:  Youtube, CNN



GOP IMPLODES ITSELF VIA VINDICTIVE ANTI-TRUMP STRATEGIES (VOTERS LOVE TRUMP)




@GOP

GOP IMPLODES ITSELF VIA VINDICTIVE ANTI-TRUMP STRATEGIES:


HOW FOOLISH TO BLOW THE PARTY'S 2016 CHANCE FOR VICTORY.

SUCH FOOLISH POLITICAL DESTRUCTION HAS TO BE A PLANNED INSIDE JOB.


I got coffee Wednesday in downtown D.C. — still semi-deserted after the weekend blizzard — with a man considered by many to possess one of the more incisive minds in conservative politics and talked about the same thing everyone else is discussing: 

How did Donald Trump happen?
“I’ve given up trying to figure it out from here,” he said.

I’ve written about my conversations with Trump supporters. A team of CNN reporters talked to 150 people in 31 cities to try to figure this out. And while there are common themes, there is no one easy answer. It’s a complex mix of factors.

Similarly, the blame game now taking place inside the GOP over who is responsible for this situation does not resolve easily. With Trump seemingly poised to win the Iowa caucuses next Monday and the New Hampshire primary the week after that, people want a scapegoat.

Much of the finger pointing assumes there is one person or thing to blame. But in fact, there is much responsibility to go around and many theories about the case.

The meme of the moment is that Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, Chris Christie and all the fat cat Republican donors funding super PAC’s have allowed Trump to grow into an actual threat by attacking one another instead of him. 

A series of ads have come out recently targeting Trump over his past support for partial birth abortion, for government-run healthcare and for sending Hillary Clinton to negotiate with the Iranians.They have sparked questions about why there was not a more concentrated, better-financed effort to make these critiques months ago.

This theory forgets that the very first salvos fired against Trump were in this lane, but they were laughed off by other Republicans. In August, Bush, the former governor of Florida and one-time frontrunner, robustly attacked Trump’s conservative credentials, but with little effect.

This was just one small step in the process of the last several months that has convinced many Trump is immune to any criticism. Trump has said so many things people thought would sink his candidacy, and has continued to rise in the polls instead. In fact, Republican operatives who have conducted focus groups in early primary states say that they have been unable to find any kind of issue or test ad that moves the needle with Trump supporters above a 50 percent disapproval mark.

So far, even though a super-PAC supporting Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas has aired $2.5 million worth of ads hitting Trump, the frontrunner’s poll numbers have not suffered. Cruz, in fact, led Trump in Iowa until the two went head to head over the past few weeks, and now Trump has clearly regained the lead there.

So there’s an argument, based on some precedent, that concentrated fire on Trump from Rubio, the U.S. Senator from Florida, Christie, the governor of New Jersey, and Bush would not make much of an impact.

In addition, Rubio, Christie and Bush are spending most of their efforts attacking one another for a reason. There is a legitimate tactical reason for doing so, as they seek to be the one to emerge after the New Hampshire primary on Jan. 9 as the alternative to Trump and/or Cruz.

Despite allowances for strategy, some have singled out Right to Rise, the super-PAC supporting Bush, for spending $20 million on TV ads attacking Rubio, while spending only $5 million going after Trump. Bush backers say Rubio is Bush’s main competition in New Hampshire, but detractors charge it’s more personal than that. Bush, critics say, still resents Rubio, who was Bush’s protege in Florida politics, for not deferring to his elder.

“Clearly Right to Rise has just decided that if Jeb can’t win then they don’t want Marco to win. It’s very personal and it’s very vindictive. It’s not necessarily smart strategy,” said Katie Packer, who helped run Mitt Romney’s campaign for president in 2012 and this month formed a super-PAC that’s attacking Trump, but with very little money behind the ads so far.

Paul Lindsay, a spokesman for Right to Rise, said that “it’s still a jump ball in New Hampshire among the non-Trump candidates in this race.”

“Jeb has arguably faced more scrutiny than any other candidate, and we think it’s important that New Hampshire Republican voters have information about the records of Rubio, [Ohio Gov. John] Kasich, and Christie before they make up their minds,” Lindsay said.

Conservative talk radio, however, is one group that could have damaged Trump’s credibility early in the primary process, but chose not to do so, said Ben Domenech, founder of The Federalist, a right-leaning news and commentary site.

“By not going after Trump early — by instead playing along with him — [Rush] Limbaugh and [Mark] Levin and [Laura] Ingraham helped protect him early on from conservative critiques,” Domenech said. Levin has of late come out strong for Cruz and taken on Trump.

Many Republicans point to the conservative media echo chamber — talk radio, Fox News, and pseudo-news sites like Breitbart and World Net Daily — to explain Trump’s rise.

“I think not a lot matters because voters feel like they have been misled, brainwashed and lied to for so long during the Obama term. We have talk radio and others on the far right to thank for this,” said a veteran Republican operative who worked on the party’s national campaign efforts over the last few years.

The anti-establishment wing of the Republican party, led by groups like The Heritage Foundation and by lawmakers such as Cruz, “went and told people over and over again that most ‘establishment’ Republicans were terrible, not pure and that they couldn’t get anything done, knowing that they were never in charge, they didn’t have the votes or the mechanisms to deliver,” said the GOP operative. “It wasn’t that they didn’t have the backbone.”

Packer added: “Talk radio doesn’t care about winning. They care about ratings. And talk radio doesn’t care about governing, they care about ratings. I’m not convinced they even want a Republican in the White House.”

But Dave Carney, a New Hampshire operative who ran former Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s 2012 presidential campaign, pointed out that establishment Republicans up and down the line ran campaigns in 2010, 2012 and 2014 promising voters that if they gained majorities in the House and Senate — which they got in 2010 and 2014 respectively — they would repeal Obamacare.

They knew perfectly well this was impossible without a Republican president, since it would require a veto-proof majority in the Senate to overturn President Obama’s certain veto of any such legislation.

The GOP operative involved with the party’s national campaigns acknowledged: “The far right opened this up and the establishment, a lot of them, jumped right in.”

Erick Erickson, one of the founders of RedState who has since started his own site called The Resurgent said that was backwards: the establishment had opened this can of worms, he argued.

“Look, Republican leaders fundraised in 2010 telling conservatives that if they got back the Congress, they’d repeal Obamacare,” Erickson said. “They won the House and the GOP said it wasn’t enough, they needed the Senate too.

In 2014, the GOP leadership actively opposed conservatives in primaries while saying if they took back Congress they’d repeal Obamacare and hold the President accountable. 

They got back the Senate and said they needed the White House too. In the process, they handed the President a blank check to raise the debt ceiling, punted fights to judges, and broke most all of their promises while disparaging conservatives.”

Erickson, who vehemently opposes Trump and was one of the 22 conservatives who took part in National Review’s “Against Trump” issue, chuckled at the Beltway area angst.

“That’s so like them to say, nuh-uh, it was you guys who did it,” Erickson said. “[House Speaker] Paul Ryan has used that talking point to me twice in the recent weeks as an explanation for the GOP’s problems. Those talk radio shows and right wing websites have only pointed out the promises the GOP made on the campaign trail and how they were being broken. They just don’t like being exposed.”

In addition, the Republican party’s leadership in Congress and elsewhere was almost nonexistent on the same media channels – in particular Fox and talk radio – that were being filled by the voices of figures like Cruz. Former House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio was, like current Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, not enthusiastic about frequent cable TV appearances.

By contrast, Ryan, the new Speaker, has moved aggressively since taking over from Boehner late last year to aggressively take his message into all corners of the media environment.

And yet for all this back and forth, how much of Trump’s support is actually from Americans who follow this debate and are animated by opposition to Obamacare? Some, no doubt.

But Domenech said that debate over whether the GOP overpromised and underdelivered on Obamacare and other conservative base concerns is secondary to what’s really driving Trump’s rise: a less partisan and less ideological anger among white working class voters over the economic and cultural impact of illegal immigration, of free trade, and at the elites who benefit at the perceived expense of blue collar workers.

“The people who support Trump are not the tri-corner hat people. Those folks are with Cruz,” Domenech said. “The anger was always out there but I think it came from a different and more disengaged group of people. It’s so telling that so many of Trump’s supporters are disengaged non-primary voters — that’s not a description that applies to most talk radio listeners.”

“It’s broader frustration at both parties animated by frustrations over three factors, the same three specific policies that Trump stresses: immigration, foreign policy, and general corruption, cronyism, fat cats getting sweetheart deals,” he said.

As I emailed and talked with others, there seemed to be no end to the theories for Trump’s mind-blowing ascent to a potential nominee for president.

Former Romney campaign adviser and Boehner aide Kevin Madden said he “trace[d] the beginnings back to” then-Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s selection as 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain’s running mate in the 2008 election, which Madden said “allowed a brand of national security and economic conservatism [to] fall victim to populism and anti-intellectualism.”

Matt Kibbe, the former head of FreedomWorks, the libertarian-leaning and Tea Party-linked advocacy group, said the GOP had been “continuously disenfranchising Ron Paul voters, Tea Partiers and grassroots conservatives.” In particular, he pointed to “the RNC rules changes that centralized power with party bosses, and the battles at the [2012] convention in Tampa.”

And then there is the celebrity and entertainment factor. That too, is a major element of Trump’s appeal. As media and technology analyst Nicholas Carr wrote this past spring, “Today, with the public looking to smartphones for news and entertainment, we seem to be at the start of the third big technological makeover of modern electioneering. The presidential campaign is becoming just another social-media stream, its swift and shallow current intertwining with all the other streams that flow through people’s devices.”

“As the Trump phenomenon reveals,” Carr wrote, “it’s only a particular kind of personality that works—one that’s big enough to grab the attention of the perpetually distracted but small enough to fit neatly into a thousand tiny media containers.”
Cable news channels also played a role in helping Trump rise, “Because ratings.”

It’s possible the political and media establishment could have done more to prevent Trump’s rise. But as most know, elite influence and power is much diminished. In previous eras, the question of who “allowed” a Trump-like figure to emerge would have been plausible, because the political and media establishments really did have significant influence over the process.

Now, because of the Internet and because of changes to campaign finance law, the media and the political parties are like gatekeepers tending old metal doors that have nearly been torn off the hinges. The gatekeepers are still there, and their broken gates swing back and forth in the wind, making squeaking noises that are audible to some who pass by.

But most people just walk past without paying much mind.


Sources: Yahoo News, CNN, CBS News, Frank Luntz

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

NORTH CAROLINA VOTERS CHOOSE TRUMP TO FIX U.S. ECONOMY (SURVEYS)





@Economy

"IT'S THE ECONOMY STUPID"

NORTH CAROLINA VOTERS CHOOSE TRUMP TO FIX U.S. ECONOMY (SURVEYS):

SANDERS & HILLARY CAME IN AT SECOND AND THIRD RESPECTIVELY.


*** Survey: North Carolinians say Trump would be best for them financially

GOBankingRates.com asked Americans ‘Which presidential candidate would be best for you financially if elected?’

Trump was the top pick in North Carolina

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton placed second and third, respectively, in the state.

When it comes to the question of which presidential candidate would be best for Americans’ finances, North Carolinians.

Sanders, 26 percent
Clinton, 20 percent
Ted Cruz, 9 percent
Marco Rubio, 8 percent
Ben Carson, 8 percent

Of the 7,728 Americans surveyed, 37 percent picked “none of the above.”

Elyssa Kirkham, a writer for the personal-finance website, said in a statement that many Americans remain dissatisfied with slow-growing wages, high taxes and other fiscal policies affecting their bank accounts. 

The survey’s results, Kirkham said, show that many candidates are offering solutions for creating greater financial security that voters find favorable.

North Carolina, the website notes, voted Republican in six of the past seven presidential elections.

The exception was 2008, the year Democrat Barack Obama was elected to his first term. Obama failed to carry the state during his re-election bid four years later.

Trump’s platform includes eliminating the “death tax,” also known as the estate tax, which is levied on the wealth a person leaves to heirs after death. 

His plan also calls for no income taxes on people who are single and earn less than $25,000, or on those who are married and jointly earn less than $50,000.

Critics have said his tax plan will increase the deficit and benefit very wealthy individuals.
GoBankingRates.com said its survey had a margin of error of 3 percent and was conducted Dec. 10-16.

Sources: Charlotte Observer, Fox News, GoBanking Rates, YouTube

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

TRUMP TO SKIP FOX NEWS IOWA DEBATE




@FoxNews

TRUMP TO SKIP FOX NEWS IOWA DEBATE:

Post Sources:  CNN, YouTube

Tuesday evening during a rally in IOWA after an Endorsement from Arizona Sheriff JOE ARPAIO, 2016 GOP presidential Frontrunner DONALD TRUMP announced he will skip the Fox News IOWA debate.

Trump states he will instead attend an event to raise money for Wounded VETS.

Trump also mentioned how the Democrat presidential candidates have completed all their debates and that "it's time for the GOP to grow up and stop playing games with endless debates".


DONALD TRUMP SAYS TRUE NATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS HIGHER THAN 23%




@Trump

DONALD TRUMP SAYS TRUE NATIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS HIGHER THAN 23%:

MAINSTREAM MEDIA ONLY REPORTS GOVT PROPAGANDA NOT THE TRUTH.

Sources:  NBC, Meet The Press, Washington Post

"They have this phony number, 5.2 percent. Everybody that quits looking for a job is considered statistically a person that has a job. It’s a phony number. You probably — real numbers like 22, 23 percent. In fact, if you look at crowds like this and crowds wherever I go, if we were really at five percent, 5.2 percent, nobody would be there.”
— Donald Trump, speech at Liberty University, Jan. 18, 2016
“You have 60, 70, 80 million people out there that want to work that aren’t getting jobs.”
— Trump, interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Jan. 10, 2016
For a supposedly successful businessman, Donald Trump has remarkably little understanding of employment statistics. In fact, he often utters contradictory “facts” depending on the venue. At Liberty University, he said that the real unemployment rate is “22-23 percent,” but in the past he has asserted it was as high as 42 percent.



TRUMP GAINS ENDORSEMENT FROM SHERIFF JOE ARPAIO





@JoeArpaio


MORE CONSERVATIVES & BLUE-COLLAR VOTERS SUPPORTING TRUMP.

BLACK VOTERS ARE COMING ONBOARD TOO.

Joe Arpaio, the hard-line anti-immigration sheriff from Maricopa County, Ariz., will appear with Donald J. Trump in Iowa on Tuesday and endorse his candidacy, according to Mr. Trump’s campaign.
Mr. Arpaio, who espouses some of the Republican Party’s most conservative views about undocumented immigrants, will appear with Mr. Trump in Marshalltown, a month after appearing with Mr. Trump in Arizona. Mr. Trump has made combating illegal immigration a staple of his candidacy, including a proposal to build a wall at the southern border.
“I have great respect for Sheriff Arpaio,” Mr. Trump said in a statement. “We must restore law and order and respect the men and women of our police forces. I thank him for his support of my policies and candidacy for president.”
In a statement released by the campaign, Mr. Arapaio said: “Donald Trump is a leader. He produces results and is ready to get tough in order to protect American jobs and families. I have fought on the front lines to prevent illegal immigration. and I know Donald Trump will stand with me and countless Americans to secure our border. I am proud to support him as the best candidate for president of the United States of America.”
Mr. Arpaio’s endorsement is part of Mr. Trump’s closing argument ahead of the Iowa caucuses, focusing on immigration, the issue that helped him dominate the political discussion in 2015. 
A day earlier, Mr. Trump’s aides announced that Stephen Miller, an aide to Senator Jeff Sessions of Arizona, is joining his team as a policy adviser. Mr. Sessions is a conservative Republican who has spoken out forcefully against a comprehensive immigration reform bill. 
But Mr. Sessions has also been cited by Senator Ted Cruz, Mr. Trump’s main opponent in the Iowa caucuses, as he has fended off questions about his own commitment to dealing with the subject of undocumented immigrants.

Sources:  NY Times, CBS News, YouTube


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