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Thursday, September 21, 2017

TRUMP DC HOTEL SUED FOR EMPLOYMENT & RACIAL DISCRIMINATION (DOMINIQUE HILL, IRVING SMITH JR); BLACK vs LATINO WORKERS







TRUMP DC HOTEL SUED FOR EMPLOYMENT & RACIAL DISCRIMINATION (DOMINIQUE HILL, IRVING SMITH JR); BLACK vs LATINO WORKERS:

I REALLY HOPE THIS ISN'T TRUE.

BLACK PEOPLE & LATINO PEOPLE ARE BOTH CONSIDERED MINORITIES BUT LATINOS CAN'T BE HIRED TO REPLACE BLACKS.

LARGE & SMALL COMPANIES ARE NOW HIRING LATINOS TO REPLACE BLACKS FOR LOWER WAGES WITH THE PREMISE THAT LATINOS ARE STILL MINORITIES.

WHEN BLACK EMPLOYEES SUE COMPANIES FOR SUCH DISCRIMINATION, EMPLOYERS DON'T BELIEVE WE CAN PROVE IT.

EEOC NO LONGER PROTECTS BLACK PEOPLE WHO ARE TRULY DISCRIMINATED AGAINST IN THE WORKPLACE.

OBAMA CHANGED EEOC LAWS TO ONLY PROTECT WHITE WOMEN, LATINOS, MIDDLE EASTERN MUSLIMS AND NON-BLACK GAY PEOPLE.

SO WHERE IS CONGRESS ON THIS ISSUE?

CONGRESS DOESN'T CARE.

YET MILLIONS OF BLACK VOTERS ELECTED CONGRESS.

IN FACT MILLIONS OF BLACK VOTERS ELECTED CONGRESS DECADES BEFORE LATINOS VOTED FOR AMERICAN POLITICIANS.



Sources: Washington Post


***** Black employees of BLT Prime, in Trump International Hotel, allege racial discrimination


Dominique Hill and Irving Smith Jr. had good jobs.

Last year, Hill worked as a bartender at P.F. Chang’s in Tysons Corner and Smith had recently been promoted to bartender at Wildfire grill, also in Tysons. Each had more than a decade of experience working in restaurants and was making $700 to $900 a week.

But last summer both of them walked away from their jobs for a chance at something better: the opportunity to work at BLT Prime, the steakhouse in the luxury Trump International Hotel, Washington D.C.

The couple said they soon discovered their hopes were misplaced. In a civil complaint filed Wednesday morning in D.C. Superior Court, Hill, a former BLT employee, and Smith, a current one, allege that the Trump Organization and hotel managing director Mickael Damelincourt saw to it that the restaurant routinely steered black employees to less lucrative shifts and subjected them to discriminatory behavior by other staff and by guests. The two men are joined in the case by another former BLT employee, JaNette Sturdivant.

Hill said he was the first bartender the restaurant hired last summer, before the hotel opened, but was almost exclusively given only lunch shifts.
“Some days I would just stand there all day long and have no customers,” he said. He routinely made $300 to $400 for a 30- to 35-hour workweek at BLT. He claims only four black employees still work at BLT after the hotel opened with 15 or more.

Smith, who works as a BLT server, said he was demoted to assistant server early on and rarely given prime shifts, where weekly earnings averaged $600 to $1,500 and which allegedly went instead to newly hired white and Latino employees.
“They started hiring all these people and instead of putting them on day shifts they was giving them night shifts and keeping us on day shift. Next thing I know, within the month all the black people were on the day shift,” he said.
In a statement, the Trump Organization, which runs the hotel, called the allegations “utterly baseless,” particularly because “the Hotel never employed these individuals.”

“Rather, the plaintiffs worked for a third-party restaurant company that is solely responsible for the direction, supervision, and management of its own employees. In short, this lawsuit appears to be nothing more than a desperate, politically-motivated publicity stunt. We look forward to litigating this matter,” said Amanda Miller, a spokeswoman for the Trump Organization, in a statement.
ESquared Hospitality, which operates the restaurant, said it “wholeheartedly” disputed the allegations and that the employees “did not previously voice or file complaints through any of the proper channels.”
“Had they done so, BLT Prime would have immediately taken the alleged complaints seriously and investigated them to the fullest extent and would have taken appropriate action where warranted,” the company said.

Trump opened the hotel last fall, weeks before he was elected president. He no longer runs his company and has placed his ownership into a trust, but the family name still adorns everything from the sign out front to the cocktail napkins. After the election, Smith claimed one of his co-workers began making racist statements to him and that Smith’s complaints to management fell on deaf ears.

The lawsuit’s allegations about the restaurant stand in contrast to the operation of the larger hotel, whose is widely diverse by race, gender and nationality. On a busy Friday night in September, when the hotel unveiled a new dessert menu, staff who appeared to be black worked in prominent positions as bartender, hostess, server, valet and other posts.
A reporter observing six shifts of morning, afternoon and evening work at BLT, viewed staffs that appeared to be diverse as well, although evening bartenders appeared to usually be white. “We work diligently to create a culture of equal opportunity employment with a zero-tolerance policy for any kind of discrimination regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion or otherwise,” ESquared said in its statement.
Gregg C. Greenberg, a Maryland employment attorney, said racial discrimination cases are often difficult to prove.

“If you have a client that says, ‘I have been discriminated against,’ how and why are you able to prove it? Do you have emails or policies in place that are objectively discriminatory? Or do you just have the feeling that someone there is out for you?” he said.
Smith and Hill, unlike most workers in the hotel, were not employed directly by the Trump Organization but by ESquared. Hill produced paperwork showing that in March he filed a discrimination charge with the D.C. Office of Human Rights and underwent mediation in July with attorneys for ESquared.
When that failed, he filed suit with representation from A.J. Dhali, a D.C. attorney who said he has brought nearly 100 employment cases in his career and averages 15 to 18 annually.
Dhali argued the Trump Organization had control over the BLT employees’ employment because of the nature of the management contract between the hotel and ESquared. Whether other black employees were treated well or not was not the issue for the court to consider, he said.
“I don’t have to show that discrimination occurred against everybody. I just have to show that discrimination occurred against my clients,” Dhali said. The plaintiffs are seeking $14.5 million in damages.
Hill and Smith said they have both experienced discrimination in other restaurant jobs. Smith said guests at Wildfire once informed management they did not want a black or gay server. “Management asked them to leave,” he said. He said management at Clyde’s issued the same directive when necessary, but that at BLT, he said he had twice observed guests requesting service from nonblack staff who were allowed to stay. The suit cites other allegedly racist behavior by some guests, and it describes a working environment where, for instance, a staff memo posted in the kitchen details how the staff ought to handle $39 ostrich eggs for a dish that includes a photo of an ostrich chasing a black man.
The third plaintiff, Sturdivant, 34, a black woman who worked at BLT from May to June as a server, claimed she was complimented on her light skin after arriving.

“When I first came on board … the server manager said it’s good to see someone with Milano complexion here,” she said. Still, she said she was not given “moneymaking” night shifts.
Hill said he was fired after dropping a bloody mary on a baby in a stroller at a weekend brunch. But he said a white server who spilled a bottle of champagne down a bride’s dress and was not suspended or fired.
“I kept saying, why am I being terminated? Why can’t I be suspended or transferred? … My feeling was Mickael, who was right there, was letting me go from the company.” After being fired he said he was without work for six weeks and had his cable and electricity cut off in his apartment. Smith lost his car because he could not make the payments.
Smith said he took a second restaurant job to pay his bills and works about 60 hours a week.
“I would go to work crying and ask god why are you doing this? We were so comfortable and gave up everything to go to this place. And then to be treated like this.”

JIMMY KIMMEL vs US SENATOR BILL CASSIDY ROUND 2 ("HE LIED TO MY FACE")





JIMMY KIMMEL vs US SENATOR BILL CASSIDY ROUND TWO ("HE LIED TO MY FACE"):

JIMMY SAYS SENATOR CASSIDY "LIED TO HIS FACE" ABOUT OBAMACARE REPLACEMENT BILL.

WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF REAL POLITICS.

ALL POLITICIANS LIE, THEY SHOULDN'T BUT THEY DO.


Sources: CNN, Eonline, NBC, Youtube


******* Jimmy Kimmel continues fight with Sen. Cassidy's new health care bill


Jimmy Kimmel was ready for the second round of his fight with U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy, saying on Wednesday night that the senator "either doesn't understand his own bill or he lied to me."

"Last night on our show I took a senator from Louisiana, Bill Cassidy, I took him to task for promising to my face that he would oppose any health care plan that allowed insurance companies to turn people with pre-existing conditions away," Kimmel said opening his ABC broadcast on Wednesday night. "He said anything he supported would have to pass what he named the 'Jimmy Kimmel Test,' which was fine... but unfortunately, and puzzlingly, he proposed a bill that would allow states to do all the things he said he would not let them do."

Kimmel then said that Cassidy made "a total about face" and that meant that "he either doesn't understand his own bill, or he lied to me."

The comedian then showed a clip of Cassidy telling CNN's Chris Cuomo on "New Day" Wednesday morning that Kimmel "does not understand" the bill.

"Oh, I get it. I don't understand because I'm a talk show host, right?" the host said before breaking down the bill in detail. "Could it be, Senator Cassidy, that the problem is that I do understand, and you got caught with your GOPenis out?"

On Tuesday night's broadcast, Kimmel took on the senate's new health care bill and Cassidy, saying he lied "right to my face." The Tuesday night monologue went viral and got around-the-clock coverage on cable news networks.

On Wednesday night's show, Kimmel also used a skit called "Barista Theater" to help explain one of the more arcane parts of the Graham-Cassidy bill: block grants. In the proposed legislation, federal funding for Medicaid expansion and subsidies would be rolled into a block grant program. States would be given a lump sum of money and would have a lot of leeway over how to spend it.

In Kimmel's sketch, he showed a barista accepting money for coffee sold in faulty coffee cups. He used the sketch to critique the bill for allowing states to accept federal money intended to make healthcare more accessible, but then keep the money without making care more available.

Kimmel jokingly said that he didn't "want to turn this into a Kanye and Taylor Swift type situation" while also taking down others, like "Fox & Friends" host Brian Kilmeade, who called Kimmel a "Hollywood elite."

"The reason I found this comment to be particularly annoying is because this is a guy, Brian Kilmeade, who whenever I see him kisses my ass like a little boy meeting Batman," Kimmel said. "He is dying to be a member of the 'Hollywood elite.'"

Kimmel also made fun of Sen. Lindsay Graham, who is a co-sponser of the new health care bill with Cassidy, saying Graham "happens to look a lot like my Grandma Jane, who is now deceased."

Kimmel also called out President Trump, saying that there's "no way" the president read the bill and just wants to get rid of it "because Obama's name is on it."

"The Democrats should just rename it Ivankacare," Kimmel said, referencing the president's daughter. "Guaranteed he gets on board."

Kimmel then ended his ten-minute-long monologue by encouraging Americans to call their senators about the new health care bill.

"Please, stop texting for five seconds and make a phone call," Kimmel said. "It really does make a difference, and who knows maybe you'll meet somebody over the phone and fall in love?"

Representatives for Cassidy, Fox News and the White House could not be reached for comment.

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******JIMMY KIMMEL SLAMS NEW HEALTHCARE BILL AND SAYS SEN. BILL CASSIDY "LIED TO MY FACE"

News flash to Jimmy Kimmel: Politicians are politicians.

The Jimmy Kimmel Live! host has used his show's monologues to speak out in favor of universal healthcare since he revealed in May in an emotional announcement on his show that his and wife Molly McNearney's second child together, son William "Billy" John Kimmel, had undergone emergency heart surgery to treat a congenital defect soon after he was born. He has also spoken out against President Donald Trump, who wants to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.

Soon after his announcement about his son's ailment, Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, who is also a gastroenterologist, told CNN that any healthcare bill should "pass the Jimmy Kimmel Test," meaning it would cover a child with congenital heart disease. He then appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live! and was asked by Kimmel if he thinks "every American, regardless of income should be able to get regular check-ups, maternity care, all of those things that people who have healthcare get and need?"

"Yep," he said, blinking.

Fast-forward to last week, when Cassidy and fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham introduced a new healthcare bill that waives regulations that require insurers to cover certain benefits, would allow states to opt out of Affordable Care Act protections for consumers, give block grants to states to run their own healthcare programs and end an expansion of Medicaid for lower-income patients and the disabled.

"This new bill actually does pass the Jimmy Kimmel Test," Kimmel said on Tuesday's episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live! "But a different Jimmy Kimmel Test. With this one, your child with a pre-existing condition will get the care he nees if, and only if his father is Jimmy Kimmel. Otherwise, you might be screwed."

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

MURIEL BOWSER TO ENACT "BAN THE BOX" IN DC TO REMOVE EMPLOYMENT BARRIER (ARREST RECORDS); ARRESTS DOESN'T EQUAL CONVICTIONS



MURIEL BOWSER TO ENACT "BAN THE BOX" IN DC TO REMOVE EMPLOYMENT BARRIER (ARREST RECORDS):

AN ARREST DOES NOT EQUAL CONVICTIONS AND MANY PEOPLE (ESPECIALLY BLACKS) CAN'T GET JOBS DUE TO VERY OLD ARREST RECORDS WITH NO CONVICTIONS.

WHITE JOB APPLICANTS WITH ARRESTS ARE STILL HIRED, NOT BLACKS.

REFUSING TO HIRE PEOPLE WHO HAVE BEEN ARRESTED WITHOUT CONVICTIONS IS A FORM OF DISCRIMINATION.

NOT EVERYONE CAN AFFORD EXPUNGEMENT.

IT'S TIME TO REMOVE SUCH BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT.


Sources: NBC News


****** DC Mayor Moves to Ease Process of Sealing Criminal Records



Mayor Muriel Bowser proposed legislation Thursday that could make it easier for D.C. residents to seal their criminal records.


DC Could Make It Easier to Seal Criminal Records


Mayor Muriel Bowser proposed legislation on Thursday that could make it easier for D.C. residents to seal criminal conviction records.


Bowser's plan proposes that arrest records that aren't prosecuted or end with a conviction be automatically sealed, wait times for record sealings be trimmed down and some convictions should be reviewed to be eligible for record sealing, according to a statement from her office.


"We know that when we remove barriers to housing, education and employment for some residents by giving them a clean slate, we are actually building a safer, stronger city for all residents," Bowser said in the statement."Through this legislation, we will give more individuals, more families, and more neighborhoods a fair shot at success."

Although sealed criminal records can't be accessed by potential employers during a background check, some employers, including those who work with children, law enforcement officials and courts can see them.Mayor Muriel Bowser proposed legislation Thursday that could make it easier for D.C. residents to seal criminal conviction records.

Bowser proposed that arrests that aren't prosecuted or don't end with a conviction automatically be sealed. The plan also calls for reduced wait times for record sealings, and a review of the types of convictions eligible for record sealing, according to a statement from her office.

"We know that when we remove barriers to housing, education and employment for some residents by giving them a clean slate, we are actually building a safer, stronger city for all residents," the mayor said in the statement."Through this legislation, we will give more individuals, more families, and more neighborhoods a fair shot at success."

Over 40,000 people are arrested every year in D.C., and only one-third of those people are prosecuted.

Brian Ferguson works in the mayor's office helping people who were released from prison assimilate back into regular life. He also was in prison for 11 years before having a conviction for homicide overturned. He said these laws could help people get back on their feet.

"Arrest records are holding them back from being able to potentially obtain employment, professional licensing, education or housing," Ferguson said.

Sealed criminal records can't be accessed by landlords, employers or other third parties during a background check. However, certain employers that serve vulnerable people, law enforcement officials and courts can see them.

Currently, under D.C. law, people must petition to have their records sealed by proving their innocence, which can take from six months to years.
According to Bowser's statement, more than 10,000 people annually ask for help to have their records sealed in D.C. Superior Court from the Public Defender Service.

JIMMY KIMMEL vs DR BILL CASSIDY, REPEAL OBAMACARE SHOWDOWN; WHAT'S IN THE CASSIDY - GRAHAM HEALTH CARE BILL??



JIMMY KIMMEL vs DR BILL CASSIDY - REPEALING OBAMACARE:

WHAT IS IN THE CASSIDY-GRAHAM HEALTH CARE BILL?

PLEASE TELL AMERICAN VOTERS TO WHOM YOU ARE ACCOUNTABLE.

FAMOUS COMEDIAN CHALLENGES GOP POLITICIAN WHO IS ALSO A DOCTOR, ON THE ISSUE OF AFFORDABLE HEALTH CARE AND DRAFTING A VIABLE REPLACEMENT FOR OBAMACARE.

CASSIDY WASN'T PLEASED.


Sources: BBC News,


***** Jimmy Kimmel attacks Bill Cassidy over healthcare bill


Comedian Jimmy Kimmel has made a scathing attack on a Republican senator behind a new healthcare plan put forward to replace Obamacare.


The late-night TV host - whose son has a congenital heart defect - accused Senator Bill Cassidy of lying "right to my face" in an earlier interview.

Republicans want to abolish President Obama's law, which expanded insurance but did not curb rising medical costs.

Mr Cassidy said the host "does not understand" the coverage in his bill.


Kimmel became a prominent voice in the healthcare reform debate after delivering a heartfelt TV monologue in May describing his newborn son's near-fatal condition.

He said his son Billy would have died if not for the star's expensive healthcare plan, which most Americans are unable to afford.

Mr Cassidy - himself a doctor - pledged that any new healthcare act must "pass the Jimmy Kimmel test" by granting insurance coverage to any child with a pre-existing condition in their first year of life, and to families, regardless of their ability to pay.


But on his programme on Tuesday night after the Republican plan was unveiled, Mr Kimmel said: "This new bill actually does pass the Jimmy Kimmel test, but a different Jimmy Kimmel test.

"With this one, your child with a pre-existing condition will get the care he needs - if, and only if, his father is Jimmy Kimmel. Otherwise, you might be screwed."

He ended his monologue saying Mr Cassidy should "stop using my name", adding "there's a new Jimmy Kimmel test for you, and its called the lie detector test. You're welcome to stop by the studio and take it".

Mr Cassidy denied Mr Kimmel's characterisation of his bill, saying "what is being circulated is by those that wish to preserve Obamacare, and they're doing everything they can to discredit the alternative".


Despite their longstanding opposition to Obamacare, Republicans have so far been unable to agree on a replacement.


Since taking control of the White House, several attempts to rally around a new plan have collapsed.

Now they have only until the end of the month to pass this latest bill.


Under the plan drafted by Mr Cassidy and Senator Lindsey Graham, state governors would get federal money in block grants to run their own healthcare programmes.


It would also allow states to forgo some of the key mandates of Obamacare, like caps on premiums paid by people with chronic illnesses.

Senator Graham said on Tuesday the bill was the party's last chance to "stop the march to socialism".


But critics fear that when left to the states, the money going into the Medicaid programme for people on low incomes would diminish.


Several Republican governors have criticised how rushed the process is and on Tuesday called on lawmakers to abandon this bill in favour of a slower, cross-party approach.

Former President Barack Obama expressed exasperation on Wednesday with the latest attempt to repeal his signature legislative accomplishment.


Speaking in New York at an event organised by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, he said the Republican bill would deprive vulnerable Americans of coverage and further increase costs.
"It's certainly frustrating to have to mobilise every couple of months to keep our leaders from inflicting real human suffering on our constituents," he added.

RACIST WHITE TEACHER TELLS BLACKS "GO BACK TO AFRICA" (SHE WAS FIRED)




RACIST WHITE TEACHER TELLS BLACKS "GO BACK TO AFRICA":

SHE WAS FIRED AFTER POSTING THIS STATEMENT ON FACEBOOK.

SHE THEN PRETENDED HER PAGE WAS HACKED.


Sources: USA Today


****** Teacher fired after Racist Facebook post


A Mississippi teacher has been fired after a racist comment appeared on her Facebook page.


The South Panola School District told WREG Tuesday that Cammie Rone, a second grade teacher at Batesville Intermediate School in Batesville, was dismissed from employment following an investigation.

Rone can appeal the decision.


Monday, Fox13 in Memphis obtained a screenshot of a post made on Rone's Facebook page.


The post read, "If Blacks in this country are so offended no one is forcing them to stay here. Why don't they pack up and move back to Africa where they will have to work for a living. I am sure our government will will pay for it! We pay for everything else."


Rone made a post on her Facebook page Monday, saying she was hacked.


"I think I have been hacked,” the post read. “I keep getting messages about racist posts but when I go to my page I can’t see it. Someone screenshoted (sic) and sent me.

If anyone knows me I post about cows recipes and home improvements stuff not racism. Please know I have not posted or made any kind of ractist (sic) comments.”


Rone did not return requests for comment. Neither post is available to the public.

ASIA IS RATTLED BY TRUMP’S THREAT TO DESTROY NORTH KOREA; “WE WILL DESTROY NORTH KOREA IF PROVOKED"



ASIA IS RATTLED BY TRUMP’S THREAT TO DESTROY NORTH KOREA:

“WE WILL DESTROY NORTH KOREA IF PROVOKED".

INTERNATIONAL HATRED & ISOLATION OF NORTH KOREA MAKES IT EASY FOR KIM JONG UN TO STARVE HIS PEOPLE IN EXCHANGE FOR DEVELOPING MORE NUKES.


Sources: ABC News


****** Trump's North Korea threat leaves Asia struggling to explain


Was it a bluff?

A warning that Washington would shoot down North Korea's next missile test?

A restatement of past policy?

Or simply just what it seemed: a straightforward threat of annihilation from the president of the United States?


Officials and pundits across Asia struggled Wednesday to parse Donald Trump's vow Tuesday at the U.N. General Assembly to "totally destroy North Korea" if provoked.

In a region well used to Pyongyang's pursuit of nuclear weapons generating a seemingly never-ending cycle of threats and counter-threats, Trump's comments stood out.

South Korea officially played them down, while some politicians worried that Trump's words signaled a loss of influence for Seoul.

Tokyo focused on his mention of Japanese citizens abducted by the North.

Analysts across Asia expressed surprise, worry, even wry amusement, in one case, that Trump's words seemed to mirror threats normally emanating from North Korean state media.

Amid the speculation, the focus of Trump's belligerence, North Korea, remained silent in the hours after the speech.

Officials from the office of South Korean President Moon Jae-in, a liberal who has advocated dialogue with the North while being forced into a hawkish position by the North's weapons tests, called Trump's words a signal of Washington's strong resolve to deal with the North, but also essentially a repetition of the basic stance that all options will be considered when confronting Pyongyang.

Trump has previously threatened the North with "fire and fury." Pyongyang responded to those past remarks with a string of weapons tests, including its sixth and most powerful nuclear detonation and two missiles that flew over U.S. ally Japan.

Park Soo-hyun, a Moon spokesman, said that Trump's comments "reaffirmed the need to put maximum sanctions and pressure against North Korea's nuclear and missile provocations" so that Pyongyang realizes that abandoning its nuclear weapons is the only way forward.

Marcus Noland, a North Korea specialist with the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, said in an online post that Trump's threat will feed a long-standing North Korean narrative that claims that the United States poses an existential threat.

"With those words, President Trump handed the Kim regime the soundbite of the century. It will play on a continuous loop on North Korean national television," Noland wrote.

North Korea's regular weapons tests are an attempt to create an arsenal of nuclear missiles that can threaten U.S. troops throughout Asia and the U.S. mainland. Pyongyang tested its first two intercontinental ballistic missiles in July and claims that it can now accurately reach the U.S. homeland, though outside experts say the North may still need more tests before its weapons are fully viable.

Each new test pushes the nation that much closer to that goal.

Some South Korean opposition politicians saw the comments as another sign that South Korea is losing its voice in international efforts to deal with the North's nuclear program.

Trump's U.N. speech came days after U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis created unease in South Korea by saying without elaboration that the United States has military options against North Korea that wouldn't involve the destruction of Seoul.

The South Korean capital is within easy artillery range of the huge array of North Korean weapons dug in along a border only an hour's drive from greater Seoul's 25 million people.

Kim Su-min, a lawmaker in the People's Party, expressed worry that South Korean officials heard nothing from Washington before both Mattis' and Trump's remarks.

"The government should comprehensively review its diplomatic and national security system and do its absolute best so that our stance on critical issues related to the existence of our country and the lives of our people doesn't go ignored," Kim said.

Diplomacy meant to rid the North of its nukes has been moribund for years, and Pyongyang has made huge strides over the last several years in its quest for nuclear tipped missiles that can reach anywhere in the world.

Trump has pushed Beijing, which is the North's only major ally, to do more to influence Pyongyang's behavior, so far to no avail.

A Chinese expert on North Korea was surprised by the vehemence of Trump's speech, saying "his rhetoric is full of military force."

Cheng Xiaohe of Renmin University said in an interview that he initially thought that "the U.S. had nearly declared war on North Korea." The speech signals that "if North Korea conducts another missile test, the U.S. is very likely to intercept."

Officials in Tokyo, meanwhile, welcomed a reference by Trump to North Korea's abduction of Japanese citizens in the 1970s and '80s.

"I think it means an understanding has gotten through" to the United States and other countries, Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasutoshi Nishimura said, according to Kyodo News service.

Trump said, "We know it kidnapped a sweet 13-year-old Japanese girl from a beach in her own country to enslave her as a language tutor for North Korea's spies."

The girl, Megumi Yokota, was one of at least 17 people that Japan says North Korea kidnapped.

Andrei Lankov, a North Korea expert at Kookmin University in South Korea, described Trump's threats as similar to the type of bluffing that North Korea has used for decades.

"It's a bit funny to see how the U.S. president behaves in exactly the same way, using exactly the same words his North Korean counterparts have been using for decades," Lankov said.

Rhetoric that isn't followed by action will eventually undermine the U.S. image internationally. "It makes American threats far less efficient," he said.
Lankov said he expects North Korea to respond to Trump's threats with "equally powerful ... equally comical" and "probably more ridiculous rhetoric."

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

HILLARY CLINTON PONDERS CHALLENGE OF 2016 ELECTION; SHE SHOULD RUN AGAIN IN 2020









HILLARY CLINTON PONDERS CHALLENGE OF 2016 ELECTION; SHE SHOULD RUN AGAIN IN 2020:

HILLARY LOST BECAUSE SHE HAD A BAD, MISMANAGED CAMPAIGN.

HILLARY HAD TOO MANY PEOPLE ON HER TEAM WHO JUST WANTED FAME & PAYCHECKS.

OBAMA DIDN'T REALLY WANT HILLARY TO WIN EITHER.

IF HILLARY HAD ME ON HER TEAM SHE WOULD HAVE WON.

TRUMP WON BECAUSE HE HAD A VERY WELL-FOCUSED CAMPAIGN, I SUPPORTED HIM AND HE DIDN'T WASTE MONEY.

I DON'T CARE WHAT ANYONE ELSE SAYS I STILL LIKE TRUMP BUT I WANT TO SEE HILLARY RUN AGAIN.

SHE WON'T REST UNTIL SHE RUNS AND WINS.

STOP BLAMING EVERYONE AND JUST RUN AGAIN TO WIN.

HILLARY BELONGS IN THE WHITE HOUSE AS THE FIRST WOMAN U.S. PRESIDENT.


Sources: NY Post, CNN, Youtube


***** Hillary Clinton still wants to challenge election results


Hillary​ Clinton just can’t face the fact that Donald Trump is in the White House and she’s not.

Ten months after her stunning defeat​ in the 2016 presidential election, the Democratic nominee held out the possibility of challenging the results if there’s solid proof of Russian interference beyond what has already been made public.

“I wouldn’t rule it out​,” Clinton told National Public Radio on Monday.


That seemed to floor the interviewer, Terry Gross.

“So what are the means, like, this is totally unprecedented in every way,” Gross said, grasping for a follow-up.

“It is,” replied Clinton.

But when asked how she would file such a challenge, Clinton was stumped.

“I don’t know if there’s any legal, constitutional way to do that​,” she admitted.

“There are scholars, academics, who have arguments that it would be, but I don’t think they’re on strong ground. But people are making those arguments. I just don’t think we have a mechanism,” she said.

Clinton got 3 million more popular votes than Trump but lost the presidency in the Electoral College, an institution she said should be eliminated.

“I do believe we should abolish the Electoral College, because I was sitting listening to a report on the French election and the French political analyst said, ‘You know, in our country the person with the most votes wins, unlike in yours.’ And I think that’s an anachronism. I’ve said that since 2000​,” she told NPR​.

Clinton insisted that if the roles were reversed — and Trump won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College — she would still be pushing for a full probe of Russia’s involvement in the election.

“Let me just put it this way — if I had lost the popular vote but won the Electoral College and in my first day as president the intelligence community came to me and said, ‘The Russians influenced the election,’ I would’ve never stood for it. Even though it might’ve advantaged me, I would’ve said, ‘We’ve got to get to the bottom of this.’ I would’ve set up an independent commission with subpoena power and everything else,” she said.

The NPR interview was part of a tour for Clinton’s new book, “What Happened,” in which she claims then-FBI Director James Comey cost her the election by announcing a new investigation into her ­e-mails 11 days before voters went to the polls.

In her chat with NPR, Clinton charged that Comey held her to a higher standard than Trump.

“Where I part company with him — and think he violated every rule in the book as a FBI director — was what he did on Oct. 28 [2016], because what he did then was to send a letter acting like he was reopening an investigation that had been closed to Congress, knowing it would be immediately leaked. And later on when asked, Well weren’t you also conducting an investigation into the Trump campaign and their connections with Russia? Yes. Well, why didn’t you tell the American people that?
Because it was too close to the election,” she claimed.

WHITE MAN (GLEASON, 23) OPENS FIRE ON BLACK FAMILY IN LOUISANA, KILLS TWO BLACK MEN IN THE NAME OF HITLER





WHITE MAN (GLEASON, 23) OPENS FIRE ON BLACK FAMILY IN LOUISANA, KILLS TWO BLACK MEN IN THE NAME OF HITLER:

POLICE SAID ATTACKS WERE RACIALLY-MOTIVATED.

KENNETH GLEASON COULD FACE DEATH PENALTY SAYS DISTRICT ATTORNEY.

DO YOU HEAR ANY LATINO LEADERS STANDING AGAINST SUCH RACIST VIOLENCE INFLICTED ON BLACK PEOPLE??


Sources: AP, ABC News, The Guardian, Youtube


***** White man accused of killing 2 Blacks had Hitler speech


• Kenneth Gleason, 23, charged with murder after shootings in Baton Rouge
• Gleason could face the death penalty, district attorney says

A 23-year-old white man arrested Tuesday was accused of killing two black men and firing on a black family in a string of attacks that police say may have been racially motivated.

A law enforcement official said they had found a copy of an Adolf Hitler speech at the home of Kenneth James Gleason, and investigators said DNA on shell casings and other evidence link him to the crimes.

Gleason was led away from the police department in handcuffs just before authorities there held a news conference to announce that he would be charged with first-degree murder in the shooting deaths last week of a homeless man and a dishwasher who was walking to work.

"I feel confident that this killer would have killed again," interim Police Chief Jonny Dunnam said.

Gleason's attorney, J. Christopher Alexander, said his client "vehemently denies guilt, and we look forward to complete vindication." Alexander declined to say anything else.

Authorities found a copy of the Hitler speech during a search of Gleason's home over the weekend, according to the law enforcement official who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

Asked whether police suspect race was a motive for the shootings, Sgt. L'Jean McKneely said: "We're not completely closed off to that. We're looking at all possibilities at this time, so we're not going to just pinpoint that."

District Attorney Hillar Moore said his office could seek the death penalty.

"It appears to be cold, calculated, planned (against) people who were unarmed and defenseless," he said. "We don't need to prove motive. There are a lot of things that are unanswered."

No one was injured when Gleason fired multiple times into the home of a black family in his neighborhood on Sept. 11, authorities said. It's not clear if Gleason knew the family.

In the other shootings, Gleason fired from his car then walked up to the victims as they were lying on the ground and fired again multiple times, police said.

Neither victim had any prior relationship with Gleason.

The first fatal shooting occurred Sept. 12 when 59-year-old Bruce Cofield, who was homeless, was shot to death.

The second happened last Thursday night when 49-year-old Donald Smart was gunned down while walking to his job as a dishwasher at a cafe popular with Louisiana State University students.

The attacks came at a time when Louisiana's capital already was in the grips of a surge in violence. The number of homicides in East Baton Rouge Parish has already surpassed last year's total of 62, The Advocate newspaper reported earlier this month.

"Baton Rouge has been through a lot of turmoil in the last year. Has there not been a swift conclusion to this case, I feel confident that this killer probably would have killed again," the police chief said. "He could have potentially created a tear in the fabric that holds this community together."

Racial tensions roiled the city in the summer of 2016 when a black man was shot to death by white police officers outside of a convenience store.

About two weeks later, a black gunman targeted police in an ambush, killing three officers and wounding three others before he was shot to death.

The city of about 229,000 is about 55 percent black and 40 percent white.

Gleason didn't appear to have any active social media profiles. A spokesman at Louisiana State University said a student by that name attended the university from the fall of 2013 to the fall of 2014 before withdrawing.

He had transferred to LSU from Baton Rouge Community College.

During the search of Gleason's home, authorities also found 9 grams of marijuana and vials of human growth hormone, according to a police document.

TRUMP CHIDES UNITED NATIONS FOR MISMANAGEMENT, URGES IMMEDIATE REFORM







TRUMP CHIDES UNITED NATIONS FOR MISMANAGEMENT, URGES IMMEDIATE REFORM:

TRUMP WANTS TO LEAD UNITED NATIONS IN A DIFFERENT DIRECTION TO HELP MORE PEOPLE GLOBALLY NOT FATTEN THE POCKETS OF ELITE GLOBALISTS.


Sources: Business Insider, CNN, Fox News, Reuters, Youtube


**** 'Bureaucracy and mismanagement': Trump urges reform during his first UN visit


U.S. President Donald Trump criticized the United Nations for bloated bureaucracy and mismanagement on his first visit on Monday to U.N. headquarters, calling for "truly bold reforms" so it could be a greater force for world peace.

Ahead of his maiden speech to the annual U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Trump hosted a short event to boost support for changes to the United Nations.

"In recent years the United Nations has not reached its full potential because of bureaucracy and mismanagement, while the United Nations on a regular budget has increased by 140 percent and its staff has more than doubled since 2000," Trump said.

"The United Nations must hold every level of management accountable, protect whistleblowers and focus on results rather than on process," Trump said.

"I am confident that if we work together and champion truly bold reforms the United Nations will emerge as a stronger, more effective, more just and greater force for peace and harmony in the world," Trump said in his first remarks at the U.N. in New York since his inauguration as president in January.

In a building where long statements are commonplace, Trump spoke for just four minutes.

Some 128 countries were invited to attend Monday's reform meeting after signing on to a U.S.-drafted 10-point political declaration backing efforts by U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres "to initiate effective, meaningful reform."

U.N. Security Council veto powers Russia and China did not sign the declaration.

Businessman Trump, who complained during his 2016 election campaign about the United States paying a disproportionate amount of money to the United Nations, made the point again on Monday.

"We must ensure that no one and no member state shoulders a disproportionate share of the burden and that's militarily or financially."

The United States is the biggest U.N. contributor, providing 22 percent of its $5.4 billion biennial core budget and 28.5 percent of its $7.3 billion peacekeeping budget. The contributions are agreed on by the 193-member General Assembly.

Guterres, who also took office in January, told the meeting: "To serve the people we support and the people who support us, we must be nimble and effective, flexible and efficient."

He agreed that U.N bureaucracy was a problem that kept him up at night.

"Our shared objective is a 21st century U.N. focused more on people and less on process," Guterres said. "Value for money while advancing shared values – that is our common goal."

Trump also said that all peacekeeping missions should "have clearly defined goals and metrics for evaluating success."

The United States is reviewing each of the U.N. peacekeeping missions as annual mandates come up for Security Council renewal in a bid to cut costs.

The United States is a veto-wielding council member, along with Britain, France, Russia and China.

On Sunday night, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met with U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi.

When asked if the U.N. refugee agency could perform its current missions if the United States cut its voluntary contributions to the budget, according to a pool report Grandi answered: "I would say no."
"U.S. aid is vital to what we do to support refugees around the world and to find solutions to their situations," Grandi said.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

FREDDIE GRAY, SANDRA BLAND, LAQUAN MCDONALD, MICHAEL BROWN, PHILANDO CASTILE, TAMAR RICE; "WE ONLY KILL BLACK PEOPLE" (LATINO LEADERS SILENT)













FREDDIE GRAY, SANDRA BLAND, LAQUAN MCDONALD, MICHAEL BROWN, PHILANDO CASTILE, TAMAR RICE; "WE ONLY KILL BLACK PEOPLE" (LATINO LEADERS SILENT):

THESE HIGH PROFILE MURDERS OF BLACK PEOPLE TOOK PLACE UNDER OBAMA BUT I'M NOT BLAMING OBAMA.

HISPANIC LEADERS REMAIN SILENT WHEN BLACK PEOPLE ARE KILLED BY POLICE.

IS CONGRESS AND THE ILLUMINATI TRYING TO REPLACE BLACK PEOPLE (BLACK MEN) WITH HISPANICS??

BLACK LEADERS HAVE SOLD OUT BLACK VOTERS.


Sources: AP, LA Times, Yahoo News, Vanity Fair, Washington Times, Youtube



****** A look at high-profile Police-related deaths of U.S. Blacks


A former St. Louis police officer was acquitted Friday in the fatal shooting of a drug suspect following a chase.

Jason Stockley was charged with first-degree murder in the 2011 death of 24-year-old Anthony Lamar Smith. Testimony in the trial ended Aug. 9, but Circuit Judge Timothy Wilson weighed evidence for more than a month before ruling.

Stockley and his partner sought to question Smith after observing what appeared to be a drug deal on a fast-food restaurant parking lot. Smith drove away, prompting a chase.

Stockley shot into Smith's car five times after the chase. He testified Smith was moving his hand toward an area of the seat where a gun was found. But prosecutors said Stockley planted the gun.

Stockley is white and Smith was black. The case is among several across the United States in recent years that have increased debate about race and policing. Here are some other high-profile deaths of blacks during police encounters:

___

FREDDIE GRAY

The U.S. Department of Justice said Tuesday it won't bring federal civil rights charges against six Baltimore officers involved in the arrest and in-custody death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man whose death touched off weeks of protests. Gray was shackled but alive when he was put in a Baltimore police van in April 2015. He came out with severe neck injuries. Six officers were charged initially, but prosecutors in July 2016 dropped all remaining charges after acquittals and a hung jury. Gray's family agreed to a $6.4 million settlement with the city in September 2015.

___

LAQUAN MCDONALD

Chicago officer Jason Van Dyke was charged with first-degree murder in November 2015, on the same day that the city, under a judge's orders, released dashcam video showing 17-year-old McDonald being shot 16 times on Oct. 20, 2014. Van Dyke, who is white, has pleaded not guilty. The Justice Department determined in January that Chicago police have a long history of civil rights violations and excessive force. A Cook County grand jury looking into allegations of a cover-up is weighing further indictments in the case, the Chicago Sun Times reported in August.

___

KEITH LAMONT SCOTT

A split review board announced in August that it won't challenge a police department's finding that its officer was justified in the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 2016. The board split 4-4 after reviewing the internal police probe. The board will issue confidential recommendations for policy changes. The shooting provoked several days of unrest, resulting in a death, dozens of arrests and millions of dollars in damage.

___

SAM DUBOSE

A judge in July dismissed charges against Ray Tensing, a white former University of Cincinnati officer who fatally shot Sam DuBose, an unarmed black motorist, during a 2015 traffic stop. The judge's decision came after a prosecutor declined to pursue a third murder trial; the first two ended in hung juries. Tensing has said he feared he could be dragged or run over as DuBose tried to drive away. The university fired Tensing, restructured its public safety department and reached a $5.3 million settlement that includes free undergraduate tuition for DuBose's 13 children.

___

SYLVILLE SMITH

A jury in June acquitted former Milwaukee officer Dominique Heaggan-Brown, who is black, of first-degree reckless homicide in the death of Sylville Smith in 2016. The shooting ignited rioting in the city. Smith was shot following a traffic stop. Police say Smith ran away holding a gun. Prosecutors say Smith fell and Heaggan-Brown shot him once in the arm as he was getting up, still holding the weapon while facing the officer. They say Heaggan-Brown's second shot came after Smith had thrown his gun over a fence. Heaggan-Brown, 25, said he thought Smith was reaching for another gun in his waistband when he fired again.

___

PHILANDO CASTILE

St. Anthony, Minnesota, officer Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted of manslaughter in June in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile, a black motorist who had just informed the officer that he was carrying a gun. The case in suburban St. Paul garnered immediate attention because Castile's girlfriend streamed the aftermath live on Facebook. Yanez testified that Castile was pulling his gun out of his pocket despite his commands not to do so.

___

JORDAN EDWARDS

Roy Oliver, a white police officer in suburban Dallas, was fired and is charged with murder in the fatal shooting in April of 15-year-old Jordan Edwards. The U.S. Department of Justice also is investigating. Oliver fired a rifle at a car full of teenagers leaving a party, striking Edwards, who was a passenger in the vehicle. Balch Springs, Texas, police had originally said the vehicle was reversing "in an aggressive manner" toward officers, but police Chief Jonathan Haber later said video taken at the scene proved the vehicle was actually driving away. Oliver is free on bond.

___

TERENCE CRUTCHER

An Oklahoma jury in May found white Tulsa police officer Betty Jo Shelby not guilty of first-degree manslaughter in the 2016 death of Terence Crutcher, 40, who was shot shortly after Shelby arrived to find Crutcher's SUV stopped in the middle of the road. Shelby testified that she was afraid because Crutcher didn't obey her commands and appeared to reach inside his vehicle. Prosecutors told jurors that Shelby overreacted, noting that videos from a patrol car dashboard and a police helicopter showed Crutcher had his hands in the air and did not have a weapon.

___

ALTON STERLING

Federal prosecutors announced in May they would not seek charges against two white police officers who were involved in a deadly encounter with Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, last summer. Sterling, 37, was shot to death on July 5, 2016, as the officers pinned him to the pavement outside a convenience store where he had been selling CDs. The killing was captured on cellphone video and circulated widely online, sparking demonstrations across Baton Rouge. U.S. Attorney Corey Amundson said Sterling was armed during the confrontation and the investigation didn't find enough evidence to pursue charges. State authorities are investigating whether to bring charges.

___

JAMAR CLARK

Jamar Clark's November 2015 shooting death sparked weeks of protests in Minneapolis. Two white officers, Mark Ringgenberg and Dustin Schwarze, were trying to arrest the 24-year-old when he was shot once in the head. He died a day later. Some witnesses said Clark was handcuffed when he was shot, but federal and state probes concluded that he was not. Investigators said Ringgenberg felt Clark's hand trying to grab his weapon and shouted to Schwarze, who then shot Clark. Prosecutors decided not to charge either officer, and an internal police investigation cleared them.

___

JEREMY MCDOLE

Jeremy McDole, 28, was sitting in his wheelchair when he was shot and killed in September 2015 in Wilmington, Delaware, after police received a 911 call about a man with a gun. A bystander's cellphone footage showed officers repeatedly telling McDole to drop his weapon and raise his hands, with McDole reaching for his waist area before shots erupted. The Delaware attorney general's office decided not to criminally charge four Wilmington police officers involved. A federal judge approved the city's $1.5 million settlement with McDole's family.

___

WILLIAM CHAPMAN II

Former Portsmouth, Virginia, police officer Stephen Rankin was sentenced last October to 2½ years in prison for fatally shooting William Chapman II while responding to a shoplifting call outside a Walmart on April 22, 2015. Prosecutors allege Rankin killed the unarmed 18-year-old "willfully, deliberately and with premeditation." Some witnesses said Chapman was combative, and one said he knocked away Rankin's stun gun. Rankin, who is white, was fired.

___

WALTER SCOTT

Prosecutors are recommending decades in prison for white South Carolina police officer Michael Slager, who shot Walter Scott in the back as the motorist fled following a traffic stop. Slager pleaded guilty in May to a federal charge of violating Scott's civil rights. A judge will determine his sentence, which could range from probation to life in prison without parole. Scott's shooting in April 2015 was captured on cellphone video and seen worldwide.

___

ERIC HARRIS

Former Tulsa County volunteer sheriff's deputy Robert Bates, 74, was sentenced in 2016 to four years in prison for second-degree manslaughter in the April 2015 death of Eric Harris, 44, who was unarmed and restrained. Bates, who is white, has said he confused his stun gun with his handgun. That shooting led to the temporary suspension of the reserve deputy program after a report found poor training of the volunteer officers, a lack of oversight, and cronyism. Bates is appealing his conviction.

___

TAMIR RICE

Tamir Rice, 12, was fatally shot by a white Cleveland police officer in a recreational area in November 2014. Officers were responding to a report of a man waving a gun. The boy had a pellet gun tucked in his waistband and was shot after the officers' cruiser skidded to a stop, just feet away. A grand jury in December 2015 declined to indict patrolman Timothy Loehmann, who fired the fatal shot, and training officer Frank Garmback. The city settled Rice's family's lawsuit for $6 million. Cleveland in May fired Loehmann and suspended Garmback for 10 days. The officers' union called the discipline politically motivated.

___

AKAI GURLEY

Rookie New York City police officer Peter Liang was convicted of manslaughter last year in the November 2014 death of 28-year-old Akai Gurley. Liang, an American of Chinese descent, said he was patrolling a public housing high-rise with his gun drawn when a sound startled him and he fired accidentally. A bullet ricocheted off a wall, hitting Gurley. A judge reduced the conviction to negligent homicide and sentenced Liang to five years' probation and 800 hours of community service. The city settled with Gurley's family for $4.1 million.

___

MICHAEL BROWN

Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by a white officer, Darren Wilson, in August 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. A grand jury declined to indict Wilson, and the U.S. Justice Department opted against civil rights charges. Wilson later resigned. The death of Brown led to months of sometimes-violent protests and became a catalyst for the Black Lives Matter movement.

___

JOHN CRAWFORD III

Police in the Dayton, Ohio, suburb of Beavercreek responded to a Walmart store in August 2014 on a call of a man waving an apparent rifle. A white officer fatally shot John Crawford III, 22, who was carrying what turned out to be an air rifle from a store shelf. Police said they believed it was a real gun and that he didn't respond to their commands to put it down. A grand jury declined to indict the officers. The U.S. Justice Department said it was reviewing the case, and an attorney for Crawford's family has filed a federal lawsuit.

___

ERIC GARNER

Eric Garner, 43, died in July 2014 in New York City after a white officer placed him in a chokehold during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes. A grand jury declined to indict that officer, or any others involved in the arrest. The city agreed to pay a $6 million civil settlement.

___

REKIA BOYD
Chicago police officer Dante Servin resigned in May 2016 after the police superintendent said he should be fired for killing Rekia Boyd four years earlier. Servin was off duty when he shot the 22-year-old unarmed woman. She had been walking down a street with her friends when he told them to be quiet, and he fired when he thought he saw a gun. Prosecutors charged Servin with involuntary manslaughter; a judge acquitted him in April 2016, saying he'd been improperly charged. The city settled a wrongful-death lawsuit in 2013 with Boyd's family for $4.5 million.

CHAIN MIGRATION IS SUPPORTED BY DEMOCRATS WHO NEED ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS TO HELP WIN ELECTIONS; TRUMP SAYS NO DEAL (MEXICO)








CHAIN MIGRATION IS SUPPORTED BY DEMOCRATS WHO NEED ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS TO HELP WIN ELECTIONS:

CHAIN MIGRATION IS NOT ABOUT COMPASSION, ONLY ABOUT POLITICS AND ELECTIONS.

IMMIGRANTS WITH HB2 VISAS ARE BRINGING OVER THEIR ENTIRE FAMILIES.

CHAIN MIGRATION IS IN FACT BACK DOOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION WHICH IS STILL A CRIME.

TRUMP SAYS NO DACA DEAL WITH CHAIN MIGRATION.

MOST DACA DREAMERS ARE ADULTS (AGE 18-40) NOT CHILDREN.

AMERICAN CITIZENS WHO COMMIT IDENTITY THEFT ARE IMPRISONED BECAUSE IT IS INDEED A CRIME.

IN USA MEXICAN ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS WHO PURCHASE SOMEONE'S SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER ARE REWARDED WITH JOBS THEY AREN'T QUALIFIED FOR AND WELFARE AND FOOD STAMPS AND STUDENT AID.


~ MOST POOR MEXICAN ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS:

MEXICO DOESN'T WANT THE POOR PEOPLE SO MEXICAN GOV'T SENDS THEM TO USA BORDERS,

MEXICO IS ALSO SENDING THEIR GANG MEMBERS TO USA BORDERS SO THAT MEXICO IS SAFER FOR TOURISTS,

CAN'T SPEAK ENGLISH,

DON'T WANT TO LEARN ENGLISH,

DON'T PAY TAXES,

DON'T WANT TO BECOME LEGAL CITIZENS,

ARE NOT WELL-EDUCATED,

ARE NOT FULLY VETTED VIA FULL BACKGROUND CHECKS OR MEDICAL EXAMS AND MANY ARE CRIMINALS FROM THEIR NATIVE COUNTRY,

DON'T POSSESS HIGH LEVEL SKILLS YET THEY ARE HIRED MORE OFTEN THAN AMERICAN CITIZENS TO WORK FOR LOWER WAGES,

MANY LOWER PAID MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS DO RECEIVE FOOD STAMPS,

DEMOCRAT LEADERS AND SOME GOP LEADERS ARE IN BED WITH BILLIONAIRE CEOS WHO WANT TO PAY LOW WAGES TO KEEP THEIR POCKETS FAT.



Sources: BBC News, Daily Mail, Breitbart, NPG, RT, Texas Tribune, Washington Examiner, Youtube



****** Now Trump says 'chain migration' of illegal immigrants' families can't be part of saving DACA as he moves toward immigration deal with Democrats


'Chain migration' is the legal ability of U.S. residents to sponsor their foreign relatives for immigrant visas, in a process that repeats itself over and over.

President Trump has already proposed a sweeping change to America's legal immigration system, limiting family visas in favor of a skills-based merit system.

As word spread that he might ink a deal with Democrats to save the DACA program, he insisted on Twitter that it won't enable more chain migration.

DACA is an Obama-era program that protects from deportation nearly 800,000 people who were brought to the U>S. illegally as children.

Conservatives fear giving them legal status would allow them to sponsor visas for the adults who broke the law by bringing them to the U.S. in the first place.

As he works toward a bargain with Democrats to resolve the status of nearly 800,000 illegal immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, Donald Trump said Friday that he wont't embrace a solution that enables so-called 'chain migration.'

Chain migration refers to the legal right of citizens and other legal U.S. residents to 'sponsor' relatives living outside the country, bringing them one by one in expanding circles until extended families have immigrated.

'CHAIN MIGRATION cannot be allowed to be part of any legislation on Immigration!' Trump tweeted Friday, putting the words in upper case letters.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters on Friday that the president will lay out his specific proposals and their limitations in between 7 and 10 days.

Under proposals favored by some Democrats, people benefiting from the Obama-era 'Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals' (DACA) program could gain legal status or citizenship, opening up the possibility that they could help overseas relatives obtain lawful residence.

The Trump administration fueled speculation on Thursday, with deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters telling reporters aboard Air Force One that a 'responsible path forward' for DACA recipients 'could include legal citizenship over a period of time.'

'But absolutely by no means will this White House discuss amnesty,' Walters added, confusing journalists on the plane.

The prospect of elevating DACA recipients to citizenship status is troublesome for conservative Republicans who point out that while they were brought into the United States, giving them the right to sponsor their parents for legal immigration status could reward the adults who snuck them across the border.

Chain migration was made part of federal immigration law in 1965 with the Hart-Celler Act, which gave relatives of legal U.S. residents preference over other potential immigrants with skills the government had prioritized.

The law has made family reunification a central plank of American immigration policy since 1924, when Congress allowed citizens' and residents' spouses and unmarried adult children up to age 21 to ignore per-country quotas and emigrate to the U.S.

In 1965 about 32,700 immigrants entered the United States on the basis of their existing family relationships.

By 2001 the annual number of family-sponsored immigration visas had grown to nearly 677,000.

Last month Trump announced his backing for a broader plan that would limit legal immigration by placing an emphasis on a skills-based merit system instead of family connections.

Applicants from foreign countries would be rewarded if they can speak English, financially support themselves and bring skills that 'can contribute to our economy,' Trump said in early August.
House Speaker Paul Ryan told the Associated Press on Thursday that 'moving from what people describe as chain migration to a skills-based merit system makes a lot of sense, while keeping nuclear families intact.'

The president stunned many Republicans this week by entering into negotiations with top congressional Democrats over the DACA program.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last week that the administration was terminating DACA itself, subject to a six-month delay intended to give Congress a window to decide recipients' fate.

The latest episode of the saga came amid Democrats' claims Wednesday night that Trump had promised to sign a bill formalizing DACA without including funding for the wall he has pledged to build between the U.S. and Mexico.

Trump himself tweeted Thursday that it wasn't true.

No deal was made last night on DACA. Massive border security would have to be agreed to in exchange for consent. Would be subject to vote,' he wrote.

But he has also offered a full-throated defense of DACA recipients, insisting that he intends to show 'great heart' in dealing with their situations.

'Does anybody really want to throw out good, educated and accomplished young people who have jobs, some serving in the military? Really!' he said Thursday morning on Twitter.

'They have been in our country for many years through no fault of their own – brought in by parents at young age.'
Trump added that he would insist on a 'BIG border security' component to any immigration deal with Congress.

CHAIN MIGRATION IS BACK DOOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION; IT IS STILL A CRIME








CHAIN MIGRATION IS BACK DOOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION:

TRUMP SAYS NO DACA DEAL WITH CHAIN MIGRATION.

OTHER COUNTRIES IMPRISON MOST ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS NOT REWARD THEM.


Sources: CNN, Texas Tribune, Twitter, Youtube



******* What is 'chain migration' and how could it disrupt a DACA deal?


President Donald Trump on Friday tweeted a new requirement of any immigration deal -- and it could throw a wrench in negotiations on how to protect young undocumented immigrants in limbo.

"CHAIN MIGRATION cannot be allowed to be part of any legislation on Immigration!" Trump tweeted Friday morning.

The term "chain migration" refers to immigrants coming to a country based on a connection to family. In the US, a small fraction of green cards are given out each year based on employment, with family connections being a much larger share.

That includes spouses, children and some extended family.

It was not immediately clear what specific item the President was referring to.

Trump has announced an end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program started by President Barack Obama, which protected young undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children.

This week, however, he jumpstarted talks with congressional Democrats on ways to save the program and potentially keep "Dreamers" in the US.

The demand from Trump could complicate negotiations on the Hill.

While there is widespread support for the concept of a DACA deal, most likely paired with border security measures, the details reveal deep divisions between and among the parties that remain steep hurdles to overcome.

Republicans almost universally would want any deal to prevent any naturalized DACA recipients from being able to sponsor their parents or family for citizenship as well.

Trump has separately endorsed a bill from Republican Sens.

Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia that would eliminate some categories of family sponsorship and limit green cards to immediate family and minor children.

It would also cut a diversity lottery and overhaul employment-based green cards to put a heavy emphasis on highly skilled, educated and English-speaking applicants.

But that bill faces opposition on both sides of the aisle, including from some Republicans, who don't like that it slashes green cards annually in half and doesn't allow for low-skilled applicants.

Still, transforming the US system from a familial approach to a more merit-based system has widespread support, though past proposals that have gotten both sides on board did not cut overall legal immigration.

IPHONE THEFT ON THE RISE NATIONALLY (I AM A VICTIM); TWO BLACK MALE TEENS ROBBED ME ON EAST COAST








IPHONE THEFT ON THE RISE NATIONALLY (I AM A VICTIM):

TWO BLACK MALE TEENS STOLE MY IPHONE ON THE EAST COAST IN BROAD DAYLIGHT.

I IMMEDIATELY CALLED LOCAL POLICE WHO DID AN AMAZING JOB ASSISTING ME.

PLEASE BEWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS WHEN USING YOUR IPHONE IN PUBLIC.

IPHONE THIEVES TARGET IPHONE OWNERS USING GOOGLE MAPS.


Sources: Business Insider, LA Times, Youtube



******* Thieves stole $16,000 worth of iPhones from an Apple Store with one simple tool: a blue shirt


At Apple Stores, the display computers and phones may be locked down to tables, but the extra devices in the back aren't.

And as it turns out, an enterprising thief needs only a blue shirt and a similarly attired partner to walk off with thousands of dollars in Apple products.

That's exactly what happened in Manhattan last week when a thief posing as a one of the familiar-looking Apple Store staffers purloined 19 iPhones — worth $16,130 — from the SoHo Apple Store.


DNAinfo reports:


Police said the thief "dressed similarly" to store employees — who usually wear blue T-shirts imprinted with an Apple logo — and walked right into an electronics repair room at about 5:30 p.m. on June 1.

The man grabbed 19 iPhones from a drawer inside the room, worth a total of $16,130, then handed them over to another thief.

That man hid the phones under his shirt, and the pair walked out of the store.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

TRUMP SAYS NO DACA DEAL W/OUT WALL, BUT DEMS SAY YES HE AGREED TO DEAL (FRENEMIES)








TRUMP SAYS NO DACA DEAL W/OUT BORDER WALL, BUT DEMOCRATS SAY YES HE AGREED TO DEAL:

KEEP YOUR FRIENDS CLOSE AND YOUR FRENEMIES CLOSER.

IS THIS DEAL DONALD'S WAY OF STICKING IT TO GOP LEADERS WHO DISSED HIM OVER OBAMACARE?

TRUMP IS A BUSINESSMAN WHO JUST WANTS A DEAL BUT WILL HE ABANDON HIS BASE WHO ELECTED HIM?



Sources: ABC News, Bloomberg News, CBS News, CNBC, Fox News, NBC News, Youtube



***** Trump Says ‘No Deal’ Was Reached With Democrats to Extend DACA



President Donald Trump insisted Thursday that there was no deal with Democrats yet to extend protections for so-called Dreamers, but the president pleaded with congressional leaders to reach one, while he vowed to push ahead with his border wall "later."

"No deal was made last night on DACA.

Massive border security would have to be agreed to in exchange for consent. Would be subject to vote," Trump tweeted in a series of posts.

"The WALL, which is already under construction in the form of new renovation of old and existing fences and walls, will continue to be built," he wrote.

"Does anybody really want to throw out good, educated and accomplished young people who have jobs, some serving in the military? Really!" Trump posted about DACA recipients. "They have been in our country for many years through no fault of their own — brought in by parents at young age. Plus BIG border security."

Trump did not deny reports that he would support a deal on DACA that didn't include the wall.

And, in brief comments to reporters Thursday, Trump said "the wall will come later" and that Republican congressional leaders were "on board" with the talks.

"We’re working on a plan. We’ll see how it works out," he said as he was departing to tour the hurricane damage in Florida. "We’re going to get massive border security as part of that."

"The wall is going to be built. It will be funded a little bit later," Trump said.

Later in Florida, the president said, "if the wall is going to be obstructed ... then we're not doing anything."

When asked if he supported amnesty, Trump cupped his hands to his lips and said, "DACA — the word is DACA."

Trump also said he was "not looking at citizenship" or "amnesty" for Dreamers but instead the discussion is about "taking care of people."

Earlier, the president said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., backed the plan.

McConnell's office said Trump had called Thursday morning, and the senator said in a statement, "We look forward to receiving the Trump administration’s legislative proposal."

Trump's tweets and remarks came just hours after he held a dinner meeting with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., after which the pair said they’d reached a deal with the president "to enshrine the protections of DACA into law quickly, and to work out a package of border security, excluding the wall, that’s acceptable to both sides."

Schumer and Pelosi, in a joint statement Thursday morning, added that Trump's tweets "are not inconsistent with the agreement reached last night."

The pair said "there was no final deal" but that "both sides agreed that the wall would not be any part of this agreement."
"The President made clear he intends to pursue it at a later time, and we made clear we would continue to oppose it," they said.

Dropping the demand for a border wall could make it easier for Republicans and Democrats to reach an agreement on DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which protects undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children.

Following the Wednesday night joint statement from Schumer and Pelosi, however, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted that, "While DACA and border security were both discussed, excluding the wall was certainly not agreed to."

But earlier Wednesday, White House legislative affairs director Marc Short told an industry trade group that the border wall does not have to be a part of an agreement on DACA, one attendee at the meeting said.

The Trump administration announced last week that the Obama-era program would end in six months. The president said as part of the announcement that, "I am not going to just cut DACA off, but rather provide a window of opportunity for Congress to finally act."

Ending DACA — a program allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children to remain and get work permits in the country — could affect as many as an estimated 800,000 people.

Sources told NBC News Wednesday night that Schumer and Pelosi told Trump they are prepared to deliver votes on a measure that would pair the existing DREAM Act text with additional border security that does not include the border wall funding.

Specifics on what type and level of border security were not disclosed.

The DREAM Act would have offered those who came to the U.S. as children the opportunity to potentially gain permanent legal residency.

The act was first introduced in August 2001 by Sen. Orin Hatch, R-Utah, and Dick Durbin, D-Ill. It has resurfaced several times, always failing to get through Congress.

At a press conference later Thursday morning, Pelosi said the DACA recipients wouldn't be granted amnesty under a DREAM Act deal with Trump, but would have "the opportunity to earn their path to citizenship."

"It’s a long path, a 15-year path, and this is an earned path," she said. "We’re not looking at amnesty; we were never looking at amnesty."

Discussion of a possible deal marked the second time in as many weeks that Trump spurned his own party to pursue an agreement with Democrats.

Last week, Trump struck a deal with Schumer and Pelosi that combined disaster aid for those affected by Hurricane Harvey with measures to keep the government open and extend the debt ceiling for three months, leaving some Republicans reeling.

News of another potential deal was met immediately with criticism from conservative Republicans.

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, an anti-immigration hardliner tweeted Wednesday that, if there was an agreement,

"Trump base is blown up, destroyed, irreparable, and disillusioned beyond repair.

No promise is credible."

Trump did not deny reports that he would support a deal on DACA that didn't include the wall.

And, in brief comments to reporters Thursday, Trump said "the wall will come later" and that Republican congressional leaders were "on board" with the talks.

"We’re working on a plan. We’ll see how it works out," he said as he was departing to tour the hurricane damage in Florida. "We’re going to get massive border security as part of that."

"The wall is going to be built. It will be funded a little bit later," Trump said.

Later in Florida, the president said, "if the wall is going to be obstructed ... then we're not doing anything."

When asked if he supported amnesty, Trump cupped his hands to his lips and said, "DACA — the word is DACA."

Trump also said he was "not looking at citizenship" or "amnesty" for Dreamers but instead the discussion is about "taking care of people."

Earlier, the president said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., backed the plan. McConnell's office said Trump had called Thursday morning, and the senator said in a statement, "We look forward to receiving the Trump administration’s legislative proposal."

Trump's tweets and remarks came just hours after he held a dinner meeting with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., after which the pair said they’d reached a deal with the president "to enshrine the protections of DACA into law quickly, and to work out a package of border security, excluding the wall, that’s acceptable to both sides."

Schumer and Pelosi, in a joint statement Thursday morning, added that Trump's tweets "are not inconsistent with the agreement reached last night."

The pair said "there was no final deal" but that "both sides agreed that the wall would not be any part of this agreement."

"The President made clear he intends to pursue it at a later time, and we made clear we would continue to oppose it," they said.

Dropping the demand for a border wall could make it easier for Republicans and Democrats to reach an agreement on DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which protects undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children.

Following the Wednesday night joint statement from Schumer and Pelosi, however, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders tweeted that, "While DACA and border security were both discussed, excluding the wall was certainly not agreed to."

But earlier Wednesday, White House legislative affairs director Marc Short told an industry trade group that the border wall does not have to be a part of an agreement on DACA, one attendee at the meeting said.

The Trump administration announced last week that the Obama-era program would end in six months. The president said as part of the announcement that, "I am not going to just cut DACA off, but rather provide a window of opportunity for Congress to finally act."

Ending DACA — a program allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children to remain and get work permits in the country — could affect as many as an estimated 800,000 people.

Sources told NBC News Wednesday night that Schumer and Pelosi told Trump they are prepared to deliver votes on a measure that would pair the existing DREAM Act text with additional border security that does not include the border wall funding. Specifics on what type and level of border security were not disclosed.

The DREAM Act would have offered those who came to the U.S. as children the opportunity to potentially gain permanent legal residency.

The act was first introduced in August 2001 by Sen. Orin Hatch, R-Utah, and Dick Durbin, D-Ill. It has resurfaced several times, always failing to get through Congress.

At a press conference later Thursday morning, Pelosi said the DACA recipients wouldn't be granted amnesty under a DREAM Act deal with Trump, but would have "the opportunity to earn their path to citizenship."

"It’s a long path, a 15-year path, and this is an earned path," she said. "We’re not looking at amnesty; we were never looking at amnesty."

Discussion of a possible deal marked the second time in as many weeks that Trump spurned his own party to pursue an agreement with Democrats.

Last week, Trump struck a deal with Schumer and Pelosi that combined disaster aid for those affected by Hurricane Harvey with measures to keep the government open and extend the debt ceiling for three months, leaving some Republicans reeling.

News of another potential deal was met immediately with criticism from conservative Republicans.

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, an anti-immigration hardliner tweeted Wednesday that, if there was an agreement, "Trump base is blown up, destroyed, irreparable, and disillusioned beyond repair. No promise is credible."

A potential deal would also go against the views of former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, who as a White House aide was credited with helping Trump emphasize a message centered on economic nationalism.

Bannon, who following his White House exit returned as the head of Breitbart News, told CBS' "60 Minutes" last week he didn't agree with Trump's decision to give Congress a window to save DACA legislatively, and that "the guys in the far-right" and "on the conservative side" were "not happy" with it either.